Events

NEXT LONDON NEUROPSYCHOANALYSIS MEETING:

 

Thursday 5 October 2017, 6 pm
UCL, 26 Bedford Way, Room 305

LUCIA RICCIARDI on THE DIAGNOSIS OF FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT DISORDERS

Abstract: Functional Neurological Disorders represent a challenging disorder to diagnose and treat. I will discuss how a correct diagnosis of functional movement disorders should rely not on the exclusion of organic disorders or the sole presence of psychological factors but on the observation or elicitation of clinical features related to the specific movement disorder. I will also discuss how the phenomenology of the abnormal movement can help us understanding ‘how’ these symptoms are generated. Pathophysiological mechanisms will be suggested based on the understanding of symptoms production.

BioLucia Ricciardi works at St. George’s Hospital and St. George’s University of London, in London, UK, as consultant neurologist and a research fellow. She has a specific clinical and research interest in movement disorders, especially in the cognitive and psychiatric aspects of these disorders. She is part of the Deep Brain Stimulation team at St. George’s hospital and she coordinates the clinic for the assessment and management of neuropsychological and psychiatric symptoms of Parkinson’s disease patients undergoing complex therapies. She was previously a clinical research fellow at the University College of London, under the supervision of Prof. Mark Edwards. She has three main research areas: 1) Emotional aspects of functional neurological disorders. 2) Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms in PD, with a particular interest in impulsive compulsive behaviour disorders in these patients. 3) Facial emotion expressivity in PD.

PREVIOUS MEETINGS:

Thursday 2 March 2017, 6 pm
UCL, 26 Bedford Way, Room 305

MANOS TSAKIRIS

Interoception: from homeostasis to self-awareness
Abstract: Modern psychology has long focused on the importance of the body as the basis of the self. However, this focus concerned the exteroceptive body, that is, the body as perceived from the outside, as when we recognize ourselves in the mirror. This influential approach has neglected another important dimension of the body, namely the interoceptive body, that is, the body as perceived from within, as for example when one feels her racing heart. In psychology, research on interoception has focused mainly on its role in emotion. Recent research, however, has attempted to go beyond this approach, aiming instead to show how interoception and interoceptive awareness serve the unity and stability of the self, analogous to the role of interoception in maintaining physiological homeostasis. My talk will consider such findings from studies on infants and adults as a means of going beyond the division between interoception and exteroception to consider their integration in self-awareness. This approach provides an alternative to existing psychological theories of the self insofar it goes beyond the apparent antagonism between the awareness of the self from the outside and from within, to consider their dynamic integration and inform us on how humans navigate the challenging balance between inside and out, in terms of both the individual’s natural (interoception vs. exteroception) and social (self vs. others) embodiment in the world.

Bio: Manos Tsakiris studied psychology and philosophy before completing his PhD (2006) in psychology and cognitive neurosciences at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL. In 2007 he joined the Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, where he is currently Professor of Psychology. His research is highly interdisciplinary and uses a wide range of methods to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms that shape the experience of embodiment and self-identity, and our social relations . He is the recipient of the 2014 Young Mind and Brain Prize, of the 22nd Experimental Psychology Society Prize and 2016 NOMIS Foundation Distinguished Scientist Award. Since 2016, he is leading the interdisciplinary Body & Image in Arts & Science (BIAS) project at the Warburg Institute, and since 2017 the INtheSELF ERC Consolidator project at Royal Holloway.

Thursday 9 February 2017, 6 pm
UCL, 26 Bedford Way, Room 305

DR SUE MIZEN

The Relational Affective Model; a neuropsychoanalytic treatment for severe and complex narcissistic disorder

Abstract: The Relational Affective Model has been developed from clinical observation of patients with severe personality disorder attending an intensive psychotherapeutic treatment programme in the NHS. The model draws upon the neuroscience literature to describe a pathway through which affect is symbolised in a relational context. The disruption of this pathway through neurological or relational deficit or psychodynamic defence is outlined to account for the failures of symbolisation observed clinically. The narcissistic defences of attributive and acquisitive projective identification described by Herbert Rosenfeld and Ron Britton provide an account of the disruption in the experience of self and other and of the boundary of the self which are common to these disorders and their associated comorbidities including eating disorders and psychosomatic disorders. The disordered pattern of relating to the body as other and the implications for psychotherapeutic practice are summarised.
Bio: Dr Mizen is a Consultant Psychiatrist in Psychotherapy. Having trained at the Cassel Hospital in West London she was a Consultant at Charing Cross Hospital in Fulham before taking up her post in Devon. She undertook her analytic training with the Society of Analytical Psychology in London. She wrote the business case for the Devon Partnership Mental Health Trust Specialist Personality Disorder Service obtaining funding for a day treatment and outpatient psychodynamic psychotherapy programme for people with severe and complex Personality Disorder who would otherwise be treated in locked placements. She is the clinical lead for this service and over the past five years has developed the Relational Affective Model which is in use in the service.  She is undertaking a neuroscience PhD at Exeter University to test the hypothesis which underpins the clinical model. She is the Chair of the Psychotherapy Faculty at the Royal College of Psychiatrists. In addition to her NHS practice she continues to practice as a psychoanalytic psychotherapist in Private Practice.

As you know by now, a Neuropsychoanalysis Group has been formed in London with special emphasis on psychodynamic neuroscience and neuropsychology research. Now in its eighth year, it usually meets at 6 pm on the first Thursday (and less frequently on the first or second Wednesday or Thursday) of each month of the academic calendar. If you read this for the first time, and are interested in joining or visiting this group, please contact: Prof Jim Hopkins at jim.hopkins@kcl.ac.ukproviding 2-3 lines indicating your discipline and the nature of your interest.

 



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THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION
FOR THE STUDY OF 
AFFECTIVE TOUCH: 
INAUGURAL CONGRESS!

University College London
Friday 20 – Sunday 22 March 2015
(Friday 1pm to Sunday 2pm) 

Details here: IASAT Full

Several influential studies have recently drawn attention to an affective dimension of touch, its social and cognitive role, as well as its neurophysiological and genetic basis. The main  aim of this congress is to
provide a platform for fruitful scientific exchanges in this nascent field. The congress will bring together for the first time researchers from around the world exploring the nature and role of affective touch in the
human brain and mind.

We particularly hope the congress will foster interdisciplinary dialogue between the different fields interested in affective touch such as psychology, physiology, genetics, neurobiology and affective neuroscience. During the meeting, we also aim to hold the first, founding meeting of the International Association for the Study of Affective Touch, in which the mission and governance of the Society can be decided.  Speakers include:

EMMANUEL BOURINET (FRANCE), CARISSA CASCIO (USA),

CHRIS DIJKERMAN (NETHERLANDS),

ROBIN DUNBAR (UK), KATERINA FOTOPOULOU (UK),

DONNA LLOYD (UK), SARAH LLOYD-FOX (UK),

FRANCIS MCGLONE (UK), MICHAEL MEANEY (CANADA),

INDIA MORRISON (SWEDEN), HÅKAN OLAUSSON (SWEDEN), 

MARTIN PAULUS (USA), CHARLES SPENCE (UK), 

SOPHIA VRONTOU (USA)

SPECIAL GUEST: CAMILA BATMANGHELIDJH (KIDS COMPANY, UK)

 

Further info: www.neuropsa.org.uk & affectivetouch@gmail.comClick here to register